Connecting the world…

1720

QoS matching for VoIP

Voice over IP is, as you know for sure, very time-sensitive traffic. That is why VoIP signaling and payload traffic should receive enough bandwidth and as less jitter and delay as possible.

QoS is an important tool to assign VoIP traffic more preference over “normal” traffic. Important for QoS tools to function correctly is placing different kinds of traffic in different queues. To place traffic in different queues, traffic should be classified. All VoIP traffic should be classified and placed in the same queue or given the same priority. I usually use the following ACL’s to match VoIP signaling and payload traffic.

VOIP SIGNALING

ip access-list extended VOIP-SIGNALING
permit tcp any any eq 1720
permit tcp any any range 11000 11999
permit udp any any eq 2427
permit tcp any any eq 2428
permit tcp any any range 2000 2002
permit udp any any eq 1719
permit udp any any eq 5060

VOIP PAYLOAD

ip access-list extended VOIP-PAYLOAD
permit udp any any range 16384 32767

The following table gives some basic explanations for the different permit statements:

Protocol Matching criteria
H.323 / H.225 TCP/1720
H.323 / H.245 TCP/11xxx
Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP) UDP/2427 and TCP/2428
Skinny Client Control Protocol (SCCP) TCP/2000-2002
Simple Gateway Control Protocol (SGCP) TCP/2000-2002
H.323 / H.225 RAS TCP/1719
Session Initiation Protocol UDP/5060
Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) UDP/16384-32767, even ports only
Real-Time Control Protocol (RTCP) UDP/16384-32767, odd ports only