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user-role

User tunnel not operational

HPE Aruba switches have the concept of user-based tunnelling. In short, the wired connections behave like a wireless connection. All traffic from the wired client is tunnelled to the central controller. This provides functions like central firewalling and micro-segmentation by blocking inter-user traffic.

Yesterday I had a customer complaining that multiple clients weren’t able to communicate. After investigation the problem focused on one HPE 2930F stack. The stack had been working without problems, but now I found the following error message in the logging.

I 01/17/20 10:16:01 05563 dca: ST1-CMDR: Failed to apply user role
THIN_CLIENT_UBT-3007-3_7Z4q with tunnel redirect to 8021X
client F44D306E2DB9 on port 3/21 as user tunnel is not operational.

I couldn’t find a lot on the internet concerning this issue. I only found something on EventID 5563 in the Aruba Event Log Reference Message Guide for ArubaOS-Switch 16.08.

The EventID description is This log event informs the user that Tunneled-node-server-redirect is enabled in the user role but per user tunnel feature is disabled.

I checked the switch “show tunneled-node-server”, and the feature is enabled. I deleted the “tunneled-node-server” configuration and reapplied the configuration to the switch, but still the same error message.

To solve the problem: CHECK THE LICENSES ON THE MOBILITY MASTER

Jan 17 07:39:10  stm[4064]: <304109> <5640> <WARN> |stm|  No available license type PEFNG for Tunneled Node 54:80:28:cf:4a:4b

A switch consumes a license for user-based tunnelling.

Aruba: Split Tunnel with a RAP-5WN

Split Tunneling is technique, which is used very often in (SSL) VPN scenario’s. The RAP-5WN access points has multiple Ethernet ports to connect different components, like workstations or printers. You can configure the usual user roles and other settings on these Ethernet ports.

You can also configure Split Tunneling per Ethernet port. When using Split Tunneling the connected components received an IP address from the company DHCP server. By using access-control lists you can specify the traffic, which is tunnel through the RAP to the central controller. Traffic, which isn’t tunneled, is NAT’ted to the local network by using the IP address of the RAP on the local network.

The configuration example below shows you how to configure Split Tunneling for an Ethernet port on a RAP-5WN. I don’t show you the provision and creation of a VAP for the remote access points. I assume that the RAP is already provisioned and currently all traffic is tunneled to the central controller.

1. The first step involves the creation of the access-control list to specify the traffic to tunnel and the traffic to bridge locally. The access-list shows that the DHCP services (udp/67 and udp/68) and traffic to the network 10.10.10.0/24 is tunnel to the central controller and all other traffic is locally bridged. This is the most important step when configuring Split Tunneling.

ip access-list session rap-split-tunnel-policy
any network 10.10.10.0 255.255.255.0 any  permit
any any svc-dhcp  permit
any any any  route src-nat

2. Next you need to create a user role and associate the previously create access-list to the user role.

user-role rap-split-tunnel-port-role
access-list session rap-split-tunnel-policy

3. The user role needs to be tied to a AAA profile.

aaa profile “rap-split-tunnel-aaa_prof”
initial-role “rap-split-tunnel-port-role”

4. The following step contains the configuration of a wired-ap-profile.. The wired-ap-profile contains the VLAN information for the connected component, the forward-mode and you can enable/disable the Ethernet port. The configured wired-ap-profile puts the client in VLAN 50, enables the port and puts the port in Split Tunnel mode.

ap wired-ap-profile “rap-split-tunnel-wired-ap_prof”
wired-ap-enable
forward-mode split-tunnel
switchport access vlan 50

5. You have all the basics configured and next you need to configure the Ethernet port profile. This profile combines the AAA profile and the wired-ap-profile.

ap wired-port-profile “rap-split-tunnel-wired-port_prof”
wired-ap-profile “rap-split-tunnel-wired-ap_prof”
no rap-backup
aaa-profile “rap-split-tunnel-aaa_prof”

6. The last step is to tie the wired-port-profile to the appropriate AP group. I configured a separate group for remote access points, called remote-o1. The configuration ties the wired-ap-profile to Ethernet 4 on the RAP-5WN.

ap-group “remote-01”
enet4-port-profile “rap-split-tunnel-wired-port_prof”

You are now ready to go!!